Centre for Educational Multimedia
     
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DEEWR

Student Generated Digital Video

Assessment and reporting

The video records of student productions, performance, analysis and reflection all contribute to the teachers’ portfolio of evidence when trying to accurately assess a student’s development. It was valued as a useful formative assessment tool allowing teachers to compare progression over time and to shape individual learning paths. It was also seen as a valuable resource in communicating with parents.

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I gave someone a very low mark for speaking and listening and the parent wanted to dispute it. And so I just walked over and let them watch one of their performances, and I didn’t say anything, and then we sat back down and she agreed. I didn’t have to argue about it. She could see the physical evidence there that he was at that level. (Years 2/3 and 3/4 Teachers, St Pius X School)

When it came to doing reports I took about 100 gig home, and I had it just playing in the background, and then you would hear someone - you know, which student and you'd look, and you'd just quickly watch what they were doing, and you knew exactly where they fitted in with him speaking and listening. (Years 2/3 and 3/4 Teachers, St Pius X School )

Many parents are daunted by it all, but... I'll just grab them and say, "Oh you’ve got to see what Shane's done today," and I'll just give them you know a CD to take home. That's probably the greatest way to support interaction and communication... and you get the feedback off the parents! (Years 2/3 and 3/4 Teachers, St Pius X School)

Pedagogy: a community effort

The role of professional development and peer support for teachers is discussed in another Digistory however, it is valuable to note that the use of student-generated video production evolved out of a collaborative professional learning community.

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The teachers at St Pius X School met regularly and shared information about their students, activities, problems and goals. It was through this process that one teacher was inspired to use video to improve his students ability to express themselves.

Another aspect of the professional learning community at Victoria School is that the teachers would also video record themselves as well as their students’ activity and share it with the other teachers. This powerful use of video was felt to improve their teaching skills as well as identify student needs and possible solutions.

The Technology

One of the reasons for the successful embedding of student-generated video in daily classroom activity was attributed to the simplicity and reliability of the technology. At Victoria School the video was recorded in two ways: a digital camera which had a video option, and a computer (iMac) which had a video camera inbuilt. The software for video editing was part of the operating system (iMovie).

An external hard drive was valued by one teacher so that he could take the video home and watch the students’ performances and reflection for assessment and reporting purposes. In addition, the ability to burn DVDs of the performances was highly valued as a way of communicating with parents about their child’s development.

Further reading

Schuck, S. & Kearney, M. (2004). Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video. View Report (approx 1Mb download)

Kearney , M. & Schuck, S. (2004, July). Authentic learning through the use of digital video. In W. Au & B. White (Eds.) Proceedings of the Australian Computers in Education Conference, Adelaide July 2004. CD-ROM. View Article

 Schuck, S. & Kearney, M. (2006). Capturing Learning through student-generated digital video. Australian Educational Computing , 21 (1), 15-20

Kearney , M. & Schuck, S. (2006). Spotlight on authentic learning: Student-developed digital video projects. Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 22(2), 189-208

Online resources for follow-up

(as time passes these links may become defunct)

References

Kearney, M., & Schuck, S. (2004). Authentic learning through the use of digital video. In W. Au & B. White (Eds.), Proceedings of the Australian Computers in Education Conference, July 2004 Adelaide

Schuck, S., & Kearney, M. (2004). Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video. [Electronic Version]. Retrieved 29 April 2008, from:
http://www.ed-dev.uts.edu.au/teachered/research/dvproject/home.html

 

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